10 Rounds with the L2 MOI MAXX Putter

A putter with lots of forgiveness, a large sweet spot and high resistance to twisting puts you on the road to making more putts since impacting the ball even a little off center, as we all know happens fairly often, can easily mean a missed putt.

Enter the L2 MOI MAXX putter the most recent model from Lateral Line Putters LLC. where forgiveness, a big sweet spot and high MOI are the whole idea.

Taking the L2 from the shipping box you notice right away the weight—it’s heavy–in fact the head weight is 620 grams. Contrast that with a “normal” putter with a head weight of around 350 grams makes the L2 more than 250 grams heavier and, as far as we know, the heftiest putter on the market. Designer and company president John Ambrose says a putter such as the L2 with a head of over one and one-third pounds makes for a smoother stroke and more putts going in the hole.

Not only does the head break the upper weight limit it is also physically huge—measuring a full six and one-quarter inches from heel to toe compared to putters we are more used to with heads such as the classic modern blade that are a little over four inches. The extra-large center shafted head due to its size (and weight) also exhibits a sweet spot Ambrose says is eight times that of most other putters, a full three and on-half inches wide.

On the course the dual alignment lines on the head visually bracket the ball so aiming is relatively easy and because the L2 has a flat sole along with the heavy head, it actually stands up by itself on the green. It is possible therefore to align the L2 while in the address position then, leaving it standing, to walk behind the line and make a final adjustment. The putter grip is extra-long with a square cross section which complements aiming by putting the hands in the proper placement.

But the grip size has another purpose as well. As Ambrose puts it, “By adding a 200 gram, 16-inch grip to the L2, we moved the stroke motion feel past the hands and wrists and into the arms and shoulders. This allows for a smooth, pendulum motion and discourages the yips.”

After ten rounds on several different courses, all with Bermuda greens and speeds ranging from medium to very quick, we got used to the feel of the L2 which is decidedly different than a “normal” putter. Hitting a seriously off line putt almost never occurred both because of the effect alignment lines and the fact virtually wherever the ball struck the face it rolled with a solid impact. The weight of the head meant the putter was always on line when the stroke finished.

As advertised the L2 is forgiving, perhaps the most forgiving we have ever tested though admittedly that’s a subjective judgement. What is without question though, if you are having problems making solid contact, beset by the “twitches” or still looking for a replacement for your banned belly or broomstick there could be some distinct benefits from this putter.

Negatives: Some may find distance control difficult because the hit is so solid with so much mass behind it. We found on downhill (particularly downhill side hill putts) and on fast greens getting the proper speed could be problematic. The flat sole, while aiding alignment, sometimes catches the grass when putting from Bermuda fringe into the grain. And as long as we are picking nits, the large square grip caused comment from everyone who tried it, not necessarily negative comments but it does take some getting used to. Finally, one players opined that carrying the extra weight L2 for a full 18 holes would be like putting three more clubs in the bag. As I said, picking nits.

Recommendation: If you need help with making solidly impacted online putts the L2 MOI MAXX could very well be the answer. The price is $169 at L2putters.com and shipping is included in the price.

It’s Furyk vs. Bjorn

By ED TRAVIS

The selection of Jim Furyk as captain of the U.S. squad is the latest in the run up to the 2018 Ryder Cup to be played against the European team captained by Thomas Bjorn over the Le Golf National in Guyancourt, France, a suburb of Paris.

Comparing the two captains is an interesting exercise though it probably doesn’t offer any significant insight as to who will win the 42nd playing for Samuel Ryder’s trophy.

Bjorn, from Denmark, has been a stalwart of the European PGA Tour counting 15 wins in his career though has never won on this country in 116 starts and his best finishes in majors have been ties for second, twice in the British Open and once in the PGA Championship. At the age of 45 he has played on three winning Ryder Cup teams – 1997, 2002 and 2014 – and has the reputation of being very vocal with his opinions, sometimes to his detriment. In addition Bjorn has been a vice-captain for the Euros on four occasions including their loss last year at Hazeltine.

The Dane’s overall record 3-4-2 in Ryder Cup play is less than eye-popping but then neither is Furyk’s at 10-20-4.

Furyk has lots of Ryder Cup experience having been a member of nine squads, two of which (1999 and 2008) won.

At Hazeltine this past fall Furyk was one of Davis Love III’s vice captains but Furyk’s best Ryder Cup moment was undoubtedly his singles match on Sunday against Sergio Garcia in 1999. Ben Crenshaw’s team overcame a four point deficit the final day achieving an unlikely victory with Furyk’s 4 and 3 win over Sergio Garcia being a highlight.

At 46 years of age Furyk is still an active member of the PGA Tour giving him current knowledge of the younger players and the Pennsylvania native can still really play. At this writing he is 37th in the world ranking points and last year at the Travelers Championship shot 58 in the final round–the lowest score ever on the PGA Tour. He has won 17 times on Tour including the 2003 U.S. Open and to go with his 58 in 2013 became the sixth player to shoot a 59.

As far as a successful defense, it’s worth noting the last time an American team was able to do it was 1993 which coincidentally was the last time they won outside of the U.S.

If you are looking for early form 21 months out there aren’t any overwhelming nor outstanding factors except for perhaps one thing. The decisive 2016 win by Team USA over Team Europe 17 to 11 probably saved the Ryder Cup from a loss of interest by fans here in America as well as potentially a loss of player enthusiasm. After all, it’s tough to get up for a team that had lost eight of the last ten Cups.

“Reports of our death have been greatly exaggerated”

“Reports of our death have been greatly exaggerated.” So said Ben Hogan Golf Equipment Company President and CEO Scott Walker in a press release announcing a company restructuring. The voluntary action aimed at cutting costs and streamlining operations included the layoff of most of the company employees, approximately 30, according to a copyrighted story in the Fort Worth Star-Telegram by Steve Kaskovich.

Walker continued in the press release, “While our organization does not look the same today as it did in 2016, we are confident that the changes we are making will make us a stronger and better company in the future.”

The release stated that at present Ben Hogan has not declared bankruptcy nor have any lenders foreclosed on outstanding debt.

In 2015 the iconic Ben Hogan brand was reintroduced at the PGA Merchandise Show with a new iron model, the Ft. Worth 15, by the new Ben Hogan Golf Equipment Company LLC after having been off the market since 2008 with Terry Koehler as president and CEO. Koehler had negotiated a licensing agreement for the name with clothier Perry Ellis who had purchased the brand from Callaway Golf in 2012. Perry Ellis continues to make and market apparel under the Ben Hogan name. Koehler formerly worked for Ben Hogan in his original company was also president and CEO of Eidolon Wedge Company.

Walker replaced Koehler as president and CEO of the Fort Worth, Tex. based operation in August 2016.

Three different iron models, one wedge model and one hybrid model are currently in their catalog.

A check of OEM’s scheduled to exhibit at the PGA Merchandise Show in Orlando starting Jan. 24 showed Ben Hogan Golf Equipment Company as not having contracted for display booth space but meeting room space off the main floor has been reserved.

The original Ben Hogan Company was started by Ben Hogan in 1953 to manufacture clubs to his exacting specifications and quickly gained the reputation of the ultimate “player’s irons.” Hogan died in 1997 at the age of 84 having sold his interest in the manufacturer some years earlier.

Keep Your Head Still…or Maybe Not

“Keep your head down. Keep your head still” are perhaps the most often heard bits of swing advice to recreational golfers from their playing partners. The trouble is, both admonishments are wrong and attempting to keep the head still especially with the chin firmly pressed downward can result in poor ball contact, a loss of distance and control.

The “head down” problem is a function of the setup position but easily fixed by correctly addressing the ball with the chin up and the derriere pushed out slightly so your weight is balanced and you’re in an athletic position…think of a shortstop preparing for the crack of the bat.

The “head still” is a little harder to fix since if the head does move, how much is OK and how much is not? Teaching professionals will tell you that the head moving slightly (maybe 2 inches?) towards the right on the backswing is correct. On the downswing the head moves back to the starting point and when the club actually hits the ball the head is moving slightly back to the right again which is described as “staying behind the ball.”

The amount of head movement and in what sequence is difficult to learn even with the help of an instructor but now there is some new technology called the PowerPlane to give you the feedback you need.

PowerPlane is simple to use, just attach the hat clip above your left ear (assuming a right handed swing), place the sensor on the clip (it’s magnetic) and set up to a ball with the PowerPlane unit parallel to the line of the shot.

If your head is out of position at address or if it goes too far in either direction during the swing the unit beeps.

We tested it and it works actually showing two of the testers they were set up too far forward at address meaning they effectively were positioning themselves for a reverse pivot. It also quickly showed there was a lot of movement on the downswing by the single digit handicap tester, sending him back to the pro shop for more range balls.

We like that the PowerPlane was equally good if you are having problems with head movement during you putting stroke or when chipping. The sound of the beep is particularly telltale for the lookup before impact either with a putter or wedge.

Negatives: Some may feel the price of $189 is a little expensive.

Recommendation: If you have conquered the problems caused by keeping your head down toward your chest and need help for fat and thin shots plus want more distance from better contact the PowerPlane can go a long way to solving the problem. For additional technical information and to purchase visit PowerPlaneGolf.net. Included in the purchase price is free shipping and a PowerPlane hat and there’s a 30-day money back guarantee.

Three New Year’s Resolutions

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My track record for keeping New Year’s resolutions is abysmal. Each year I faithfully promise but sometimes mine don’t even make it to January 2nd.

A number of years ago I resolved to play more often, even if it was only a few twilight holes and to take my wife and children for a family experience that can’t be beat. However, problems arose even before the snow was off the ground when I bought a new company and soon was spending 12 hours most days in the office, many times seven days a week.

Unfortunately for our golf games without taking decisive changes old habits return with the warm weather so each new season soon tends to look similar to the previous one.

However, here are three resolutions for 2017 you can keep and they come with an added bonus. With a little determination they will change your game forever. After all one of golf’s oldest maxims is the better you score the more fun you have.

Resolution #1 Learn how to chip and putt – You’ve heard it before, to score well you must play well within 100 yards of the green so not being proficient at those little shots is just wasting strokes. On the green start with a putter that fits you and fits your stroke. It should be the correct length so your bend at the waist allows your arms hang relatively straight and the putter head should have lots of forgiveness since we don’t hit the ball in the center of face as regularly as we would like. The second tip concerns chip shots. Use a less lofted club to get the ball on the ground and rolling as quickly as possible. My observation is the poorer the player the more likely he will be using a lofted wedge when a 9-iron or even a 7-iron would produce better results more easily. Plus, if the collar is fairly smooth, a putter is likely to the best choice.

Resolution #2 Take enough club – There is absolutely no question the single biggest mistake recreational players make hitting into a green is not using enough club. Golf course architects know this of course which is why if they want to make a hole really tough they put sand or water in front. Still not convinced? The last round you played how many times was your ball past the pin or even pin high? Was there even one? The corollary to this point is, just because in 1999 you hit a 7-iron 150 yards downhill downwind to a concrete-like green doesn’t mean that’s your 150-yard club. Be realistic as Harry Callahan (a.k.a. Clint Eastwood) said, “A man’s got to know his limitations.”

Resolution #3 Get a driver fitting – The height of ridiculousness is spending $400 or more on a driver without knowing if it’s the one best suited for your particular swing. Most days a driver is hit only fourteen times and hopefully always in the fairway but let me give you an example. My last session with a master fitter at the local Club Champion location found I could raise my smash factor (ball speed divided by clubhead speed) from an average of 1.45 to 1.50 by changing drivers. That may not sound like much but the effect was immediate. Roughly ten yards more off the tee which means one full club less into the green. I don’t know about you but I’m more accurate with an 8-iron than with a 7-iron. The cost isn’t prohibitive either, at Club Champion a driver fitting is $150.

So give these three resolutions for 2017 some consideration. They are easy to keep and will change your game forever.

Top Ten Golf Stories of 2016

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The King
The death of Arnold Palmer saddened the golf world and the millions outside golf he touched through his charities. The King wasn’t just a record setting golfer nor just another person, father, businessman and philanthropist. He was Arnold Palmer being Arnold Palmer with integrity, humor, intelligence and humility.

Tiger’s comeback
As U.S. Ryder Cup team vice-captain Tiger Woods didn’t have to put his game on display. That came in the Hero World Challenge with a limited field of 18 after being off the Tour for 16 months. Woods finished in 15
th place and said he was hoping to play a full schedule (as yet to be determined) in 2017.

Ryder Cup
The win by Team USA over Team Europe by the decisive score of 17 to 11 probably saved the Ryder Cup from a serious loss of interest by American fans and a marked decrease in player enthusiasm. Prior to this year the US had lost eight of the last ten contests and this win it was a not only a team effort (every U.S. player contributed at least one point) but a vindication for captain Davis Love III.

Olympic Golf
Justin Rose took the gold medal beating Henrik Stenson (silver) and Matt Kuchar (bronze) while In Bee Park easily won the ladies gold in golf’s much heralded return to the Olympics. Before the Games what was thought to be a bigger story was the list of top men players who declined to go to Rio: Jason Day, Dustin Johnson, Jordan Spieth and Rory McIlroy. Reasons cited included health concerns (zika virus) and potential security problems.

Anchored Stroke Ban
The impact of the USGA banning anchored putting strokes which took effect on Jan. 1 had absolutely no effect on recreational players. They either said, to heck with the USGA I’ll putt however I want to, or bought a shorter length putter. The anguished predictions by some (who should have known better) that the slamming of trunk lids and squealing of tires from club parking lots as players left the game in droves were emphatically wrong.

Finchem Retires
Tim Finchem’s 22 years as commissioner of the PGA Tour built on the foundation previous commissioner Deane Beman had laid. The Tour now can boast a 47 week event split season with $339 million prize money, the largest charitable giving of any sport, three events in Asia, assets of $2.2 billion and a $10 million season-ending prize. Add to that getting golf back in the Olympics, creation of the First Tee and World Golf Championship series he compiled a stellar record. Not bad for a button-down lawyer who at one time worked for President Jimmy Carter. Finchem leaves a prosperous and dynamic legacy for successor Jay Monahan.

USGA Double Bogey
The USGA had a wretched summer. First was the fiasco of Dustin Johnson’s U.S. Open final round when officials said he might have caused his ball to move on the green but wouldn’t make a decision until the round was completed leaving him, fans and fellow competitors in the dark. They of course gave him a one-stroke penalty but fortunately the phlegmatic South Carolinian had such a large margin he still won by three. That was followed at the U.S. Women’s Open when second-place finisher Ann Norqvist was shown on HDTV moving three grains of sand in a bunker with her club but officials neglected to inform her of the penalty until a hole later. In response to the did-he-or-didn’t-he cause the ball to move the USGA created the “Johnson Rule” so there will be no penalty should a player accidentally move his ball. This year won’t go down as the best summer the organization has ever had.

Spieth Didn’t–Willet Did
Jordan Spieth had a record setting 2015 season and seemed to have this year’s Masters in his pocket until he came to the par-3 12
th hole of the final round. He managed to take a seven after two balls the water which handed the title to Danny Willet. However, this collapse wasn’t “the most shocking in golf history” as an ESPN writer sadly lacking in perspective wrote. Spieth still had two victories for the year plus the Australian Open and he’s only 23 years old.

Turmoil in Equipment Business
This past year marked several significant changes with Nike Golf leaving the club and ball business, Acushnet (Titleist, FootJoy and Pinnacle) became publically traded and adidas attempting to sell TaylorMade Golf which continued to suffer with early year sales declines. Retailers Sports Authority and Golfsmith went bankrupt with Dicks Sports Goods buying up inventory and locations while Callaway Golf, Srixon, Wilson Staff, Ping and upstart Parsons Xtreme Golf pushed for added market share. The new year may see some additional upheaval especially if TMaG’s new owner decides to adopt a different product strategy…that is, if there is any deal at all.

One for the Ages
The British Open played at Troon saw Phil Mickelson finishing with a 65 and was 11 strokes in front of the next lowest score for 72 holes. Lefty’s problem was Henrik Stenson shot 63 in the final round beating Mickelson to win his first major by two. Both played some of the best golf ever, evoking memories of the Tom Watson/Jack Nicklaus final round 1977 match up aptly named the “Duel in the Sun.”

Last Minute Golf Gifts

The time is getting short and each sometimes forget to buy a gift for someone on our list. For me last year it was my daughter’s boyfriend and thank goodness for gift cards.

This year I’m applying the criteria that whatever I get for him is something I would like myself so here are a few suggestions.

cc-driver-wall_640x440Get Fit
For even the casual player a club fitting can produce huge benefits and there are no better fitters than Club Champion with 16 locations around the country. They have special on until the end of January of 50% off a $350 full bag fitting and 33% off if just a driver, iron and putter fittings are chosen. Club prices are the same as any retail shop and they have gift cards in $50 increments. More information may be found at ClubChampionGolf.com.

Take a Swingcindy-miller
Cindy Miller, one of the best golf instructors around, has a gift that’s ideal even for non-golfers, “The Learn to Hit Kit” of a mat, foam balls, her book Golf 101, a coupon for 10% off any Callaway club plus access to her 10 video online course. Miller’s approach has modules for every level from never-had-a-club-in-hand-before novices to accomplished players. Buy “The Learn to Hit Kit” on Amazon on special for $99.99.

traxtowel_golfbag_baglatch-it_1000x1000-copy-686x686Trax Towel
Everyone has a towel on their bag and sooner or later it falls off but this new idea from Frogger is a solution, simple and effective. The Trax towel (20 by 24 inches microfiber) has a magnetic fastener, Frogger calls a Catch Latch, consisting of a clip with a magnet that attaches to the towel and a bracket that attaches to the golf bag. Six color combinations are offered and all are available at FroggerGolf.com for $24.95.

Record Drives
driver-product-open-800_1024x1024The hottest idea in golf is the real time recording of shot stats and Arccos Golf has a great way to try out their system without paying full price, the Arccos Driver. Included are one sensor that fits into the hole at the butt end of the driver grip and the apps for either an Apple or Android smartphone plus on a one year subscription to cloud recordkeeping. Priced at $49.95 it’s a great way to find out just what this new technology can do to help your game at $200 less than the whole bag system. For details and to find a retailer go to ArccosGolf.com.

Gifts for Golfers Part II

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As in the previous installment, here a few gifts golfers (myself included) would like to see under the tree on Christmas morning. They have the distinction of meeting the criteria of, “If I like them so will lots of others.”

Shirts by Carl Spackler
Bill Murray’s portrayal of the spaced-out greenskeeper Carl Spackler in Caddyshack is classic and so is the apparel in his new line of William Murray Golf clothing. You won’t go wrong with one their polos styled in classic lines with modern, even a bit edgy, details. Murray, a lifelong Chicago Cubs fan, even came up with a pin stripe polo mimicking the World Series Champion’s uniform. Moisture wicking and wrinkle resistant, it sells for $75 at WilliamMurrayGolf.com.

Display Your Patriotismpatriot-victorystripe_150x330
Specially designed for the Birdies for the Brave and Navy Seals, the Patriot VS headcovers from Stitch Golf make a dashing statement as well as displaying your patriotism. Entirely made of leather in the U.S. they are water and stain resistant but best of all they really stay on the clubs, either carrying or carting. A set of three—driver, 3-wood and 5-wood—is $125 at StitchGolf.com.

kenrick_leather_belt_300x215Ditch the Clutter
Carrying a ball marker and divot repair tool is something we all do and are forever fishing in a pocket to find one or the other or both. A neat good looking solution is the belt from KenRick Golf that holds them at your fingertips at all times. The divot tool slips into the belt end and the marker is held by a magnet on the back. Lots of styles and colors available from $59 at KenRickGolf.com.

Play in the Coldae9305_zoom_f-200x345
Cooler weather tends to empty courses of players but golf can still be fun provided you are dressed for it properly. Take a look at the Climaheat Prime Quilted Zip Jacket ($150) from adidas. Filled with insulation made of hollow-core fibers that retain body heat yet dry quickly. The front and back panels are quilted, cuffs and bottom hem have elastic binding and the two front pockets are zippered. In a choice of three color combinations at adidasGolf.com.

Performance Socksmens-kw-pro-light-black-red-300x170
Kentwool socks for golf have to be worn to be believed. They are made here in the U.S. from wool blended with stretch nylon, Spandex and bamboo fabric and are long wearing. They are cool and wick perspiration away but best of all is they are comfortable. Period.  There’s a variety of lengths, colors and patterns but we especially like the basic Pro Light model which is priced at $20.95 per pair on Kenwool.com.

Gifts for Golfers Part I

There lots of gift guides for golfers but this year rather than the usual approach we thought it would be neat to show our list of items that the writer and a few of his friends that were consulted would like to have.

Our thought process was simple…heck, if we like them, other people will as well, so here is the first installment of gift ideas. Hopefully my family will read this and know just what’s on my wish list.

71tbxrjicwl-320x480Palmer’s Memories

A Life Well Played: My Stories by Arnold Palmer is 258 pages of anecdotes, stories and life insights by The King. Some you’ve heard before and some you haven’t but each is written in the straightforward honesty that characterized the man. Golfers and non-golfers have been enlistees in Arnie’s Army since the 1950s and this book is a fitting closure to a life well played. Online at Amazon and Barnes & Noble for $16.96 or in local book stores.

 

powerplane-_cmf_160727_300x145For Your Swing

One swing fault most of us struggle with at times is holding the head relatively steady so the swing can rotate around the proper axis. If you don’t know what that means or if from occasionally you slip into letting the head slip—move excessively from side to side–the PowerPlane can help. A bar laying on the ground senses head movement from a transmitter attached to your cap and signals whenever your head moves too much. More information and to buy go to powerplanegolf.net. The price is $189.

Comfortable Performance Shoes nbg1005bk-002-300x200

New Balance Golf Men’s Minimus NGB1005 are built like running shoes, are lightweight and have a waterproof upper. Support for the foot is great, comfortable and the last promotes staying on balance throughout the swing. Minimus weighs 8.6 oz. and there’s a choice of White/Blue, Grey/Green, Grey/Orange and Black for $119.95 at NewBalance.com.

hoofer_12_black_charcoal_red-copy-300x290Easy to Carry

The Ping Hoofer is at the top of the list for carry bags and makes a perfect gift. It weighs only five pounds including the bag stand but has more than enough pockets to stow away all your gear with a full length apparel pocket. There are even special slip in pockets for a range finder and water bottle plus a cart-strap channel if used on a buggy. Comes with a rain hood for $215. To purchase or find more information go to PingGolf.com.

PGA Show – Looking for Answers

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At this writing we are just over two months to the opening of the 2017 PGA Merchandise Show—in fact we are within 75 days. Open only to members of the golf industry it is the most important annual meeting in the business. Next year it runs from January 24th with a Demo Day held at the Orange County National Golf Center and ends on January 27th after three days of exhibits in Orlando’s Orange County Convention Center.

In particular those making and selling golf equipment will be looking for answers to the direction that part of the industry is taking.

Changes to the equipment OEMs and retailers have been coming at a rapid pace.

Dick’s Sporting Goods (NYSE:DKS) owner of Golf Galaxy has purchased bankrupt competitor Golfsmith and will leave just 30 of the Golfsmith locations open which clearly changes big-box retailing of equipment. At the same time aggressive competitors such as PGA Tour Superstore and Worldwide Golf Shops (owners of Roger Dunn Golf, Edwin Watts Golf, The Golf Mart, Golfers’ Warehouse, Van’s Golf and Unita Golf) are working hard to increase their share of the approximately $4.0 billion U.S. market.pga-merchandise-show-logo_2017

So one question is, how will the reduction in golf retail space with the closing of Golfsmith effect golf consumers, club OEM’s and the retailers themselves? Will the expansion in the number of locations by competitors compensate for Golfsmith’s loss and how will club pricing to golfers be affected?

Sales of clubs, balls, merchandise, greens fees, golf related travel and golf-front real estate values are all impacted by the number of golfers but with that number at best holding its own the business is not expanding.

Nike Golf’s exit from the club business has been projected to have minimal impact on the other OEMs but having said that Callaway Golf (NYSE:ELY) under CEO Chip Brewer has been very aggressive and is introducing attractive new products for the 2017 season. They reported a 6.9 percent increase in sales for the third quarter this year and project a substantial increase in earnings for the full year.

The other publically traded OEM Acushnet (NYSE:GOLF), makers of the best-selling Titleist golf balls, has just had its initial public offering of stock and said sales increased slightly (under 3 percent) in the quarter ending June 30 accompanied by increased profit. Acushnet also has a new line of drivers and fairway woods that are receiving good reviews.

The second largest OEM, after Acushnet, TaylorMade Golf is up for sale and has been for the past six months, evidentially with no takers. Owner adidas (OTC:ADDYY) said TMaG sales have been higher and for the first nine months of 2016 club and ball sales showed “double-digit increases” sales with higher profitability.

Other manufacturers such as Tour Edge Golf, Cobra Puma Golf and Srixon are also pressing to gain market share, albeit in a stagnant market, which means any increased sales will have to be at the expensive of another company rather than from market growth.

So the question is what will the future bring and the answer could be coming at the PGA Show. Not only will all of the new clubs and balls be available for evaluation but as significantly, industry insiders may be able to forecast which direction the market is moving. Millions of dollars ride on the decisions made.